Telecommunications

Vaucluse, Sydney: Anti-5G vandals set fire to new Optus telecommunications tower in affluent suburb

A 5G vandal BURNING down the new Optus Tower in one of Sydney’s most exclusive suburbs under cover of night

  • An anti-5G arsonist set fire to an Optus telecommunications tower in the middle of the night
  • The inhabitants of Vaucluse woke up to the blackened debris of the new 5G tower in Vaucluse
  • CCTV footage showed a person walking to and from the pole moments before the fire
  • The installation of 5G had been a point of contention before its installation in May
  • Residents fear the electromagnetic radiation from the box will lead to insomnia










An anti-5G vandal has left a trail of charred remains on an affluent suburban street after setting fire to a brand new Optus telecommunications tower in the middle of the night.

Residents of Vaucluse, Sydney’s eastern suburbs, woke up Monday morning to the smell of petrol and blackened debris at the base of the 5G tower at the corner of Derby Street and Cambridge Avenue.

CCTV footage from a nearby house showed a long-haired pedestrian wearing a beanie walking to and from the tower moments before it burst into flames at 2.32am.

The 5G box had been a point of contention in the area before it was installed in May – amid misinformed concerns the electromagnetic energy emitted from the tower would cause insomnia and anxiety among residents.

CCTV footage captured a pedestrian wearing a beanie walking away from an Optus 5G tower moments before it caught fire

A local circulated a petition against the installation of the tower in March and asked that it be installed in a park instead, away from residential areas.

But the inhabitants of Vaucluse did not imagine that the box was deliberately sabotaged, especially since it brought a vital signal boost to mobile phone users.

‘To me it doesn’t feel like a local’s job,’ one resident told the Sydney Morning Herald.

“I know there was a bit of anxiety about the tower, but I don’t think anyone took it too seriously. I wouldn’t know anyone who would do that because we all enjoy our phone coverage mobile.

A shocked resident reported the charred telephone pole to NSW Police, but police said on Monday they had no record of the call being made.

Optus said there was a service disruption in the Vaucluse area later in the day, but added that no one informed them of the fire.

Pictured is the new 5G tower on the corner of a residential street in Vaucluse in Sydney's eastern suburbs.  Residents woke up Monday morning to blackened debris and the smell of gasoline at the tower after it burned down

Pictured is the new 5G tower on the corner of a residential street in Vaucluse in Sydney’s eastern suburbs. Residents woke up Monday morning to blackened debris and the smell of gasoline at the tower after it burned down

5G installations have been repeatedly damaged in Australia, Europe and the United States in recent years as the high-speed mobile network is rolled out across the world.

Last year, more than 300 protesters, including 5G conspiracy theorists, gathered in Parliament in Melbourne to push unsubstantiated claims that the technology is dangerous to humans and can even help spread Covid-19.

Australia’s chief medical officer, Professor Brendan Murphy, said the protest was the result of “a lot of very stupid misinformation”.

Pictured is an Optus 5G tower in Canberra.  5G installations have been repeatedly damaged in Australia, Europe and the United States in recent years

Pictured is an Optus 5G tower in Canberra. 5G installations have been repeatedly damaged in Australia, Europe and the United States in recent years

Pictured is a protester carrying a sign pushing the debunked theory that '5G kills' in Berlin in April 2020

Pictured is a protester carrying a sign pushing the debunked theory that ‘5G kills’ in Berlin in April 2020

“There is absolutely no evidence that 5G does anything in the coronavirus space,” Professor Murphy said.

Experts also say the level of radiation emitted from 5G towers is safe for humans.

Rollout of 5G networks in Australia began in June 2019, with technology using a similar frequency to existing 3G and 4G networks.

The only difference with 5G is that it can run at faster speeds because it uses a higher band.

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